Difference between revisions of "Mark Moore"

From Ed•sy•clopedia
(Assorted edits for consistency with other person profiles)
 
Line 1: Line 1:
 
{{Orgspeoplenav}}
 
{{Orgspeoplenav}}
 
[[Category:Person profile]]
 
[[Category:Person profile]]
'''Mark Moore''' is a the Hauser Professor of Nonprofit Organizations at Harvard Kennedy School.
+
'''Mark Moore''' is a the Hauser Professor of Nonprofit Organizations at Harvard Kennedy School.<ref name=":1" />
  
 
==How their work relates to education systems==
 
==How their work relates to education systems==
  
In "Creating Efficient, Effective, and Just Educational Systems through Multi-Sector Strategies of Reform," Moore's work focused on developing a scheme for describing national education system by defining and measuring the aggregate demand for education, as well as the wants, needs, rights, and obligations to education within a society. Moore finds that most national education systems are a mix of private and public sectors. Ultimately, this paper argues that the main challenge for education policy of national governments is determining how to build a national education system that can learn by doing, and by talking about the value of what is produced through the system.<ref>Moore, M. 2015. Creating Efficient, Effective, and Just Educational Systems through Multi-Sector Strategies of Reform. RISE Working Paper. 15/004. https://doi.org/10.35489/BSG-RISE-WP_2015/004</ref>  
+
In "Creating Efficient, Effective, and Just Educational Systems through Multi-Sector Strategies of Reform," Moore develops a scheme for describing national education system by defining and measuring the aggregate demand for education, as well as the wants, needs, rights, and obligations to education within a society. Moore finds that most national education systems are a mix of private and public sectors. Ultimately, this paper argues that the main challenge for education policy of national governments is determining how to build a national education system that can learn by doing, and by talking about the value of what is produced through the system.<ref>Moore, M. 2015. Creating Efficient, Effective, and Just Educational Systems through Multi-Sector Strategies of Reform. RISE Working Paper. 15/004. https://doi.org/10.35489/BSG-RISE-WP_2015/004</ref>  
  
 
In "Creative Destruction or Idiot Winds: Schumpeterian Theory Meets the Educational Sector in Developing Countries," Moore explores the question of how developing countries can best continue to make progress and accelerate the rate of learning. Moore makes the same assumption that much of RISE's research has supported: "important productivity gains in the educational systems of developing countries will not be solved simply by increasing the scale of resources committed to the task."<ref name=":0">Moore, M. 2019. Creative Destruction or Idiot Winds: Schumpeterian Theory Meets the Educational Sector in Developing Countries. RISE Working Paper Series. 19/029. https://doi.org/10.35489/BSG-RISE-WP_2019/029</ref> Because simply investing more money in what has already been done will not make the gains we wish to see, Moore suggests that education systems must innovate "widely and quickly to find better ways of providing educational services to produce better educational outcomes."<ref name=":0" />  
 
In "Creative Destruction or Idiot Winds: Schumpeterian Theory Meets the Educational Sector in Developing Countries," Moore explores the question of how developing countries can best continue to make progress and accelerate the rate of learning. Moore makes the same assumption that much of RISE's research has supported: "important productivity gains in the educational systems of developing countries will not be solved simply by increasing the scale of resources committed to the task."<ref name=":0">Moore, M. 2019. Creative Destruction or Idiot Winds: Schumpeterian Theory Meets the Educational Sector in Developing Countries. RISE Working Paper Series. 19/029. https://doi.org/10.35489/BSG-RISE-WP_2019/029</ref> Because simply investing more money in what has already been done will not make the gains we wish to see, Moore suggests that education systems must innovate "widely and quickly to find better ways of providing educational services to produce better educational outcomes."<ref name=":0" />  
Line 11: Line 11:
 
==Brief biography==
 
==Brief biography==
  
Mark Moore is a member of the RISE Intellectual Leadership Team. He is the Hauser Professor of Nonprofit Organizations at Harvard Kennedy School. Moore is the author of Creating Public Value: Strategic Management in Government, one of the most influential books ever written on how public sector organisations work. His current primary focus is studying the processes that enable social innovation and change to occur in response to changing political, economic, and social conditions. He also writes extensively on criminal justice and social innovation. [[File:Mark Moore RISE.png|thumb|Mark Moore, RISE ILT Member. https://riseprogramme.org/]]Moore holds an undergraduate degree from Yale University and an MPP and Ph.D. from the Kennedy School of Government at Harvard University.<ref>"Mark Moore". ''www.hks.harvard.edu''. Retrieved 2021-08-24. https://www.hks.harvard.edu/faculty/mark-moore</ref>
+
Mark Moore is the Hauser Professor of Nonprofit Organizations at Harvard Kennedy School. Moore is the author of ''Creating Public Value: Strategic Management in Government'', one of the most influential books ever written on how public sector organisations work. Currently, his primary research focus is studying the processes that enable social innovation and change to occur in response to changing political, economic, and social conditions. He also writes extensively on criminal justice and social innovation.<ref name=":1" />
 +
 
 +
He is also a member of the RISE Intellectual Leadership Team.<ref>RISE Programme. "Mark Moore." https://riseprogramme.org/people/mark-moore Accessed 2021-08-31.</ref> [[File:Mark Moore RISE.png|thumb|Mark Moore. https://riseprogramme.org/]]Moore holds an undergraduate degree from Yale University and an MPP and Ph.D. from the Kennedy School of Government at Harvard University.<ref name=":1">"Mark Moore". ''www.hks.harvard.edu''. Retrieved 2021-08-24. https://www.hks.harvard.edu/faculty/mark-moore</ref>
  
 
==Key publications related to education systems==
 
==Key publications related to education systems==
Line 25: Line 27:
 
==References==
 
==References==
 
<references />
 
<references />
 +
[[Category:Researchers]]

Latest revision as of 15:39, 31 August 2021

Organizations & people

working to improve education systems
Edsyclopedia icon people orgs.png
Organizations
People

Mark Moore is a the Hauser Professor of Nonprofit Organizations at Harvard Kennedy School.[1]

How their work relates to education systems

In "Creating Efficient, Effective, and Just Educational Systems through Multi-Sector Strategies of Reform," Moore develops a scheme for describing national education system by defining and measuring the aggregate demand for education, as well as the wants, needs, rights, and obligations to education within a society. Moore finds that most national education systems are a mix of private and public sectors. Ultimately, this paper argues that the main challenge for education policy of national governments is determining how to build a national education system that can learn by doing, and by talking about the value of what is produced through the system.[2]

In "Creative Destruction or Idiot Winds: Schumpeterian Theory Meets the Educational Sector in Developing Countries," Moore explores the question of how developing countries can best continue to make progress and accelerate the rate of learning. Moore makes the same assumption that much of RISE's research has supported: "important productivity gains in the educational systems of developing countries will not be solved simply by increasing the scale of resources committed to the task."[3] Because simply investing more money in what has already been done will not make the gains we wish to see, Moore suggests that education systems must innovate "widely and quickly to find better ways of providing educational services to produce better educational outcomes."[3]

Brief biography

Mark Moore is the Hauser Professor of Nonprofit Organizations at Harvard Kennedy School. Moore is the author of Creating Public Value: Strategic Management in Government, one of the most influential books ever written on how public sector organisations work. Currently, his primary research focus is studying the processes that enable social innovation and change to occur in response to changing political, economic, and social conditions. He also writes extensively on criminal justice and social innovation.[1]

He is also a member of the RISE Intellectual Leadership Team.[4]

Moore holds an undergraduate degree from Yale University and an MPP and Ph.D. from the Kennedy School of Government at Harvard University.[1]

Key publications related to education systems

See also

References

  1. 1.0 1.1 1.2 "Mark Moore". www.hks.harvard.edu. Retrieved 2021-08-24. https://www.hks.harvard.edu/faculty/mark-moore
  2. Moore, M. 2015. Creating Efficient, Effective, and Just Educational Systems through Multi-Sector Strategies of Reform. RISE Working Paper. 15/004. https://doi.org/10.35489/BSG-RISE-WP_2015/004
  3. 3.0 3.1 Moore, M. 2019. Creative Destruction or Idiot Winds: Schumpeterian Theory Meets the Educational Sector in Developing Countries. RISE Working Paper Series. 19/029. https://doi.org/10.35489/BSG-RISE-WP_2019/029
  4. RISE Programme. "Mark Moore." https://riseprogramme.org/people/mark-moore Accessed 2021-08-31.